Responding to Consumer Concerns: Artificial Colorants

Monica Theis Department of Food Science - Responding to Consumer Concerns: Artificial Colorants Food Science 321: Food Law and Regulations provides students with a broader understanding of the profession of food science by situating domestic practice within a global context. Global learning outcomes: Course offerings and travel opportunities will provide students with the opportunity to: 1) understand the field of food science within the global context and compare application of food science in the U.S. with other countries; 2) identify and explore political, economic, and social issues, trends, and processes common to the food industry and food systems throughout the world, and; 3) compare the work of a food scientist from the U.S. with a peer in a different country.
June 11, 2014
-20140611
case-study
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Responding to Consumer Concerns: Artificial Colorants

Monica Theis teaches Food Science 321: Food Law and Regulations. This class provides students with a broader understanding of the profession of food science by situating domestic practice within a global context. This interactive case scenario was borne out of a partnership between Engage and CALS International Programs. In the interactive case scenario she developed, students assume the role of an intern working for a large U.S. based candy company considering the empowerment of individual consumer concerns through the power of social media and the implications of business decisions based upon international food regulations.  Students interact with the online interactive case scenario outside of class in preparation for in-class discussion and final individual recommendation to the company board of directors.
November 21, 2013
-20131121
awards
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Livestock Production: Digital Media Assignment

Jess Reed, Animal Sciences, International Teaching Modules for the Animal Sciences: Cases from Southeast Asia With support from a Science Curriculum Internationalization Partnership Award, students in Professor Reed’s fall 2012 Livestock Production 370 lab produced videos about the challenges that farmers face in different parts of the developing world. Guided by media specialist Gina Smith, four teams of students took “virtual research trips” to the watershed region of the Mekong River Valley to research the social, economic, and cultural aspects of a different challenge. They were then tasked with introducing viable solutions. To make the videos, the students made use of Professor Reed’s own archived notes and images! Videos: Laos Vietnam Gong Ri Xiang Gonka The above video was accepted and published in the 2013 Digital Salon. Contributing staff presented their innovative project at the Teaching & Learning Symposium that same year.
November 15, 2013
-20131115
animal-sciences
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Community Development or Rank Imperialism?: Global Food Security and the Availability of Arable Land

Professor Jeri Barak created a complex interactive case scenario involving multiple perspectives and no clear answer for her First Year Interest Course (FIG) on Global Food Security. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Her interactive case scenario was borne out of a partnership between Engage and CALS-International Programs. Students engaged with content as individuals outside of the classroom, documenting their recommendations for supporting one of four land use proposals in Ethiopia. Students then discussed and worked collaboratively on their recommendations during class before writing final individual proposals for the instructor. Engage wrote a letter of support for Dr. Barak’s NSF-Career proposal that will include the FIG for the outreach component. Read about the reactions of Professor Barak’s students. Course(s) impacted: Course(s) impacted: Plant Pathology 375: Global Food Security (First-year Interest Group) Global learning outcomes: Students will: 1) gain an understanding of the role of the science of food and agriculture in the context of agricultural development; 2) learn the trends and systems that drive the complex global food chain. By the end of the course students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the cause of ...
October 9, 2013
-20131009
africa
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Strengthening Undergraduate Environmental Studies with International Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation

To develop and integrate international, comparative case studies into three undergraduate courses that focus on ecology and the conservation of biodiversity. Case studies will illuminate cultural differences in the meaning and use of wildlife, carnivore conservation, assumptions about indigenous stewardship, etc. This project also entails expanding an online learning simulation of wolf hunting in Wisconsin to include Sweden as a comparative case. Project Heads: Adrian Treves (Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies) Courses Impacted: Environmental Studies 600: Large Carnivore Conservation in Wisconsin and around the World; Environmental Studies 651: Conservation Biology; Botany/Zoology/Environmental Studies 260: Introduction to Ecology Global Learning Outcomes: “My desired global learning outcomes are to help our undergraduates become informed citizens of the world who can place U.S. environmental problems in a global context and devise wiser, more sustainable solutions by translating and combining insights from many regions to create novel solutions to environmental problems. Such intellectual and creative capacities will demand familiarity with events, systems, successes, and failures in other countries. In the course of such instruction and mentorship, I expect undergraduates and my mentees to gain a better understanding of how science is done in other ...
August 20, 2013
-20130820
biology
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Integration of International Scientific Research and Exchange of Multiple Cultural Perspectives to Meet the Challenges of Avian Conservation

To develop a new undergraduate course in ornithology and to develop and integrate a case study of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole. The newly developed course, Animal Sciences 375: Advance Topics in Ornithology, will provide a seminar of undergraduates with in-depth exposure to a specific avian conservation research topic, that of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole. Using audio data recorded on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles, students will analyze the specific calls, communicate with the scientific research staff at the Montserrat Division of Environment (DoE) and with key members of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, and then map distributional trends using GIS software. Ultimately students will make conservation recommendations taking into account, among other things, the unique culture found on Montserrat. These students will then create a 50-minute, multimedia-rich synopsis of the project and present it during one regularly scheduled lecture to students enrolled in Animal Sciences/Zoology 520 and 521. Project Heads: Mark E. Berres (Animal Sciences) Courses Impacted: Animal Sciences/Zoology 520: Ornithology; Animal Sciences/Zoology 521: Birds of Southern Wisconsin; and a new course, Animal Sciences 375: Advanced Topics in Ornithology Global Learning Outcomes: A strategic outcome from ...
-20130820
animal-sciences
10

Internationalization of Soil Science 325: Pedology

To revise the course on soil formation, morphology, and mapping to give students an appreciation of the different perspectives and methodologies of international soil classification systems (beyond the USDA Soil Taxonomy) and illustrate the complex decision-making process involved in soil classification and mapping. A familiarity with differing classification systems can better prepare scientists to work in international projects and in global consortia developing worldwide digital soil databases. During the fall of 2012, visiting professor Pavel Krasilnikov of Moscow State University will deliver lectures and case studies on the subject which will be captured by video and incorporated into successive courses. Project Heads: Alfred Hartemink (Soil Science); Annatasia Tapsieva (Soil Science) Courses Impacted: Soil Science 325: Pedology Global Learning Outcomes: Students will: 1) appreciate how soils differ across the landscape, in the state of the Wisconsin, in the USA, and globally and the ways in which naming and classification of soil provides a language for discussing such diversity; 2) become familiar with perspectives and methodologies of international soil classification systems; 3) develop an appreciation for the advantages and disadvantages of the different international soil classification systems; 4) become away ...
-20130820
awards
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